Antiracism/Justice Archive

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Misremembering Dr. King

Posted on 18 May 2014 (0)

Jennifer J. Yanco’s Misremembering Dr. King – Revisiting the Legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. is out from Indiana University Press. Don’t be scared off by her academic publisher: Yanco writes in clear, non-jargon language how “we” (she includes herself) so easily forget Dr. King’s core beliefs. It’s easy for us, she says, to remember […]

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Read This Memoir on Understanding Whiteness

Posted on 28 February 2014 (55)

If you’ve been enlightened by Tim Wise’s White Like Me: Reflections on Race from a Privileged Son, or intrigued by my white privilege-related essays, do read Debby Irving’s memoir, Waking Up White and Finding Myself in the Story of Race, just out in 2014. The book’s cover is of a happy little girl at dinner, […]

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Why Read Slave Narratives?

Posted on 01 October 2013 (329)

I bring an array of books to the People Challenging Racism class I co-lead, offering to loan them during the semester. These books include memoirs by formerly enslaved men and women. But that none of the students – young, old, white or of color – asks to borrow any of these personal accounts of bondage. […]

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My new booklet of racism-related essays

Posted on 23 October 2012 (73)

My 2nd booklet of personal essays, Was I Thinking? Digging Deeper into Everyday Racism is just out and available from my distributor. The racial justice publisher Crandall, Dostie and Douglass Books sells it for $8.95 at www.cddbooks.com. Same price for my first booklet, What Was I Thinking? Reflecting on Everyday Racism (2010). Here’s the Table […]

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Reconciled to Jargon

Posted on 30 April 2011 (1,070)

Several years ago, when I sat on the diversity committee of the National Writers Union, we asked anyone attending our caucus to introduce him or herself as either a “person of color,” an LGBT person, a person with a disability — or an ally of one or all of the above. I happily introduced myself […]

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Integrity and an Open Mind

Posted on 30 April 2011 (17)

Here I am, trying to move past my white-bread mindset, in hope of being able to listen with an open mind to the perspectives of people of color.  At the same time, I think of Shakespeare’s “To thine own self be true, and thou canst not be false to any man” and I wonder: how […]

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Everything You Need to Know About …

Posted on 30 April 2011 (3)

When I became determined to free myself of group stereotypes based on ignorance, I first tried a shortcut, reading book with titles like Everything You Need to Know About Latino History, Everything You Need to Know About Asian American History, 100 Things Everyone Should Know about African Americans, or The Arab-American Handbook. As for Native […]

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Reconciled to Jargon

Posted on 04 April 2011 (2)

Several years ago, when I sat on the diversity committee of the National Writers Union, we asked anyone attending our caucus to introduce him or herself as either a “person of color,” an LGBT person, a person with a disability — or an ally of one or all of the above. I happily introduced myself […]

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The Warmth of Other Suns: Bk Review

Posted on 07 October 2010 (3)

Isabel Wilkerson’s The Warmth of Other Suns – The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration is a great narrative journalism saga, told through the stories of three African Americans — who were among the millions of Southern Blacks who went North (one in 30s, one in 40s, one in 50s) to escape white supremacist threats […]

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Eye Opening

Posted on 23 May 2010 (2)

 Liz Petry, author of “At Home Inside: A Daughter’s Tribute to Ann Petry”      http://www.upress.state.ms.us/books/1134 and “Can Anything Beat White? A Black Family’s  Letters” www.lizpetry.com  comments on her blog http://lizr128.wordpress.com/ Barbara Beckwith has done a brave and wonderful thing in writing What Was I Thinking?: Reflecting on Everyday Racism. I’ve long believed that no one in the United […]

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